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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 16-29

Herbal Remedies from Aquatic and Semi-aquatic Plants Conserved at Siddha Medicinal Plants Garden (CCRS), Mettur Dam, Salem District, Tamil Nadu


Siddha Medicinal Plants Garden (Central Council for Research in Siddha, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India), Mettur Dam, Salem district – 636401, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
M Padma Sorna Subramanian
Siddha Medicinal Plants Garden (Central Council for Research in Siddha, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India), Mettur Dam, Salem district – 636401, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Introduction: This paper reports on aquatic/semi-aquatic plants from the Siddha Medicinal Plants Garden (SMPG),Mettur Dam, Salem district of Tamil Nadu, which are used to cure various diseases in Siddha system of medicine. Materials and Methods: In the present review, information on Siddha formulations of the plants and medicinal properties along with their taxonomy, habit and habitat were presented by citing authentic publications. Results: Thirty-three aquatic/semi-aquatic plant species used in herbal remedies are being presented in this paper along with their description, medicinal uses as single drug or in combination. At SMPG, aquatic, semi-aquatic and marshy plants are being maintained at model herbal gardens I and II, petaloid pond, poly green house and arboretum. Among these aquatic species, some plants are sold in the market and directly used by the AYUSH practitioners due to their medicinal values, viz., Alternanthera sessilis (L.) R.Br. ex DC (Ponnankanni), Bacopa monnieri Penn. (Brahmi), Centella asiatica(L.)Urban (Vallarai), Eclipta prostrate L. (Vellaikarisalai), Phyla nodiflora Greene. (Poduthalai), Sphagneticola calendulacea (L.) Pruski (Manjalkarisalai), Spilanthes acmella DC. (Palvalipoondu) etc. Some of the species were explored enormously and their formulated herbal products are available in the global market. Conclusion: Aquatic plants have been widely used in traditional medicine with a long Indian history. They are reputed for treating a number of ailments. Thus far, many studies are significant in aquatic plants but limited to the level of clinical uses, conservation and cultivation.


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